Pedro Cabrita Reis (Portugal)

Lisbon, 1956

The Passage of the Hours

The work refers simultaneously to a historic ruin and a recent remnant of a conflict

In close collaboration with the museum, Pedro Cabrita Reis created a new work entitled ‘The Passage of the Hours’. Measuring 8 x 8 x 24 metres, it is a construction in steel, brick, glass and fluorescent lamps.

The sculpture, which inhabits the border between architecture and art, is closely linked to the development of the artist's work in terms of both content and use of materials. Construction and deconstruction are intertwined.

The work refers simultaneously to a historic ruin and a recent remnant of a conflict – it is a ‘serene disturbance’, which is also the title of one of the artist’s other works. He calls it a church without religion, and the walls do indeed resemble the buttresses of a medieval cathedral. The light cast by the fluorescent lamps is an integral part of the artwork, and the lamps remain on day and night.

This work holds a prominent position in the park, not in the last place thanks to the background of the nearby hospital. It is a well-integrated sculpture. This latter point will certainly appeal to Reis, as he is not only a sculptor but also a painter and photographer with experience in film and ceramics.

With support from Middelheim Promotors.

Location

Number 51 on the map

Specifications

  • The Passage of the Hours
  • 2004
  • h 800 cm x w 2400 cm x d 800 cm
  • Glass, aluminium, brick, iron, cement, fluorescent tubes
  • MIDW507